Surprise Saturday Post

I don’t normally post on Saturdays, but I wanted to share a few photos and stories I’ve seen on the web recently and liked. Happy weekend!

These photos, a collaboration between Polish photographer Marcin Nagraba and costume designer Angieszka Osipa, are stunning.

pagan-slav-culture-photography-marcin-nagraba-angieszka-osipa
By Marcin Nagraba, Agnieszka Osipa

I have long been an admirer of Jim Carey and a blogger I follow posted this inspiring video. “I needed color.”

I don’t think I would be brave enough to decorate my home this way, but this place is one-of-a-kind.

And last, this made me smile. 🙂

bride
From the Game of Slavs FB page

Traditional Clothing and Handmade Rugs

I was in Pristina over the weekend and had a chance to wander through this street fair. I previously posted about the Pristina Bazaar, which is like an expanded farmer’s market. In comparison, clothing and rugs were sold at this fair.

Pristina fair 2
OSCE Trade Fair
Pristina fair
Pristina fair
Albanian rugs
Handmade rugs
buy Albanian clothing
Traditional Kosovar clothing
Traditional Albanian dress
Traditional clothing, Kosovo
Kosovo Albanian childrens clothing
Children’s traditional clothing, Kosovo
handmade goods kosovo
Handmade goods

I LOVED this handmade, wool rug. It was 120 Euro, which I think is very reasonable. While I have bought or been given a few little trinkets I’ll keep to remember my time in Kosovo, I’d really like a larger conversation piece for my home someday. (A “pièce de résistance,” as the French would say.)

Albanian handmade wool rug
GORGEOUS!

“Oh,” I’ll tell visitors to my home, with my eyes getting misty, “I bought that in Kosovo when I was serving in the Peace Corps.”

I think I could bring a rolled-up rug with me on an airplane. The problem is, I’ll already have about 100 lbs. of luggage to wrangle when I leave Kosovo.

I walked by the tent several times to gaze longingly at *my* rug … 🙂

A day later, I saw the following music video on tv. I thought it was cool because the singers and dancers are wearing traditional clothing. The video is an interesting blend of old and new (and appears to have been filmed somewhere in the Balkans).

I didn’t know the name of the video (it’s Hatixhe, a woman’s name) so I texted my teaching counterpart for help in finding it online. She’s really good at that. I’ll be like, “What’s the video with blahty-blah?” and she’ll know exactly what I am talking about.

If you’d like to see some other music videos, here are links to other posts I’ve written:

Q&A: Becoming a Teacher and Secondary Projects in the Peace Corps

 

Hi, everyone! I’m posting another video today. This week’s questions come from James, who will be coming to Kosovo as a volunteer this June. Thanks for your questions, James!

  1. Could you post about your transition from social work to teacher? (0:25)
  2. Are you a licensed social worker? If so, how are you maintaining your license while serving?* (2:21)
  3. What types of secondary projects are you working on or thinking about engaging? (4:05)
  4. Are there opportunities to work with children outside of a classroom setting? (4:58)

*I misspoke. My license will be up for renewal in January 2018. I don’t know my years …

If anyone else has questions for me, please let me know!

 

Q&A: Life in the Peace Corps

My sister asked the following questions for this week’s video:

  • What hobbies do you have besides reading and crocheting? Are those your favorite things to do? (0:18)
  • Is there something you want to learn (craft-wise) while you’re there? (0:46)
  • How do you spend your days when you’re not teaching? (1:04)
  • Is there a crochet project you have in mind to do next? (1:15)
  • How have your feelings about being in Kosovo/Peace Corps changed over the last 9 months? (1:37)
  • What have you gotten used to that was a big adjustment for you? (2:10)
  • What adjustments are you still struggling with? (2:56)
  • If you could change something about your time there, what would it be? (If you could change anything, no questions asked, your wish is granted.) (3:36)
  • Is there something you would have changed when you arrived but don’t feel that way anymore? (4:10)
  • What has been your favorite thing about living in Kosovo? (4:47)

After watching this video, I realized I said “um” a bunch of times. I thought about re-recording, but laziness prevailed. Maybe I’ll practice my public speaking skills and try to do better next time. 😛

Thanks for the questions, Kris!

 

Q&A Video: Questions About the Peace Corps

I haven’t made a video in a while, so I asked my friends and family if they had any questions I could answer. My friend Dana (thanks, Dana!) asked the following:

  1. What do most Peace Corps folks do once their service is up? (0:15)
  2. Do people tend to go back to their old jobs or fields? (0:50)
  3. Is there a way to carry on another term? (1:15)*
  4. Would there be opportunities to work stateside? (2:15)

*I misspoke. You can extend any length of time up to a year.

As always, if you have questions you would like me to answer about life in Kosovo or the Peace Corps, please contact me. (Keep in mind, I can’t talk about politics — Kosovo, U.S., or otherwise.)

Q&A from Pauline, Version 2.0

I hadn’t made a video in forever, so when my friend Pauline emailed me some questions, I decided to record the answers. 🙂

  1. What are the demographics of the other teachers at your school? (0:15)
  2. Are they friendly toward you? (0:28)
  3. Are there places like cafes in your town? (1:04)
  4. What are your weekend plans? (1:43)
  5. What is the first substantial school vacation you have? Do you have any plans? (2:35)

Also, if you have any questions you’d like me to answer, please email me or leave a comment in the comment section of the blog!

Do You Have Questions? I Might Have Answers

“Tell me, tell me, tell me the answer … ” — The Beatles, Helter Skelter

Hi, Everyone! I’d love to get some feedback from you. I made this video to help explain.

There are two subjects (possibly more) that I will not broach on this blog:

  1. As I’ve stated previously, I am not going to write about the Kosovo War.
  2. The Peace Corps is a politically neutral organization. Therefore, I will not be writing about politics here.

If you have any other questions, comments, or suggestions, please leave a note in the comment section. Thank you!