Batlava Lake, Kosovo

Living in Kosovo is the first time I have ever been landlocked. The town where I grew up shares a border river with Canada. When I lived in Boston for two years, I would sometimes spend my lunch break at the harbor. And my last apartment in Chicago (which I rented for 4.5 years) had a view of Lake Michigan from every window.

When I was home last month, my family and I went to a local arts and crafts fair along the water. As we watched a giant freighter float down the river, my Dad asked, “Are there boats like that in Kosovo?” And I said, “We don’t have water in Kosovo. It’s all mountains.”

Well, that’s not entirely true. Kosovo is mountainous and shares land borders with four other countries (Serbia, Macedonia, Albania, and Montenegro). However, it does have a few lakes. On Friday, my friend Chester and I visited Batlava Lake, a man-made lake.

When we arrived, we walked halfway around the lake, and decided to rent a paddleboat. (Cost: 5 Euro for one hour.)

When we were done paddling, we walked halfway back around the lake and had lunch at a restaurant on the water.

Batlava Lake was clean and quiet. I was surprised more people weren’t there. It was a nice little summer day trip. 🙂

Batlava Lake sign
Walking to the lake
Batlava Lake
Ridiculously beautiful view
Batlava Lake
The beach
B Lake
Representing America
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Boat rental … We opted for a paddle boat.
Batlava Lake 9
On the water
Batlava Lake 7
Tall trees
Kosovo
Moo

If you plan to visit Batlava Lake, here is something to note: You don’t catch the bus at the main bus station in Pristina. Instead, you catch the bus at a stop near here:

take the bus to lake batlava kosovo

The cost is 1.70 Euro each way (it is about a 45-minute trip from Pristina to the lake).

Batlava Lake
So pretty

Traditional Clothing and Handmade Rugs

I was in Pristina over the weekend and had a chance to wander through this street fair. I previously posted about the Pristina Bazaar, which is like an expanded farmer’s market. In comparison, clothing and rugs were sold at this fair.

Pristina fair 2
OSCE Trade Fair
Pristina fair
Pristina fair
Albanian rugs
Handmade rugs
buy Albanian clothing
Traditional Kosovar clothing
Traditional Albanian dress
Traditional clothing, Kosovo
Kosovo Albanian childrens clothing
Children’s traditional clothing, Kosovo
handmade goods kosovo
Handmade goods

I LOVED this handmade, wool rug. It was 120 Euro, which I think is very reasonable. While I have bought or been given a few little trinkets I’ll keep to remember my time in Kosovo, I’d really like a larger conversation piece for my home someday. (A “pièce de résistance,” as the French would say.)

Albanian handmade wool rug
GORGEOUS!

“Oh,” I’ll tell visitors to my home, with my eyes getting misty, “I bought that in Kosovo when I was serving in the Peace Corps.”

I think I could bring a rolled-up rug with me on an airplane. The problem is, I’ll already have about 100 lbs. of luggage to wrangle when I leave Kosovo.

I walked by the tent several times to gaze longingly at *my* rug … 🙂

A day later, I saw the following music video on tv. I thought it was cool because the singers and dancers are wearing traditional clothing. The video is an interesting blend of old and new (and appears to have been filmed somewhere in the Balkans).

I didn’t know the name of the video (it’s Hatixhe, a woman’s name) so I texted my teaching counterpart for help in finding it online. She’s really good at that. I’ll be like, “What’s the video with blahty-blah?” and she’ll know exactly what I am talking about.

If you’d like to see some other music videos, here are links to other posts I’ve written:

Kosovar Superstitions

When I visited the village of Gračanica this spring, my friend provided me with two tourists guides put out by the municipality. These glossy booklets are filled with all kinds of interesting information — history, notes on culture and religion, recipes, etc. They are accompanied by color photos, too.

Gracanice Kosovo tourism boolkets

I pulled the following list of superstitions from one of these booklets. This list is slightly abridged; I included my “favorite” superstitions, or the ones I found most interesting.

  • When the left palm itches, you’ll receive money. If the right palm itches, you’ll spend money. (Don’t we have some version of this in the U.S.?)
  • If a rabbit crosses a road to a traveler, it means an accident will happen. (Sounds like the old “black cat crossing your path” superstition. I hate that superstition. I love black cats.)
  • On Sundays and Wednesdays, you shouldn’t cut your nails. It brings trouble. (Duly noted.)
  • When a cat warms its back near the fire, winter will be cold. (This one just seems like common sense to me. “Oh, kitty is cold? I bet that means winter will be cold!” [Also, when is winter ever not cold, at least comparatively?])
  • When a rooster crows on the sunrise, weather will be bad. (If this were true, the weather would be bad every day in Kosovo … at least according to my host family’s rooster.)
  • When a donkey rolls in mud, it will rain. (If there’s mud, doesn’t that mean it already rained?)
  • If you drop a bite while bringing it to your mouth, that means the devil took it. (Yikes.)
  • You shouldn’t hold a child by the neck, because it will not grow. (You shouldn’t hold a child by the neck because it’s a mean thing to do.)
  • You shouldn’t burn a broom; you’ll get a toothache. (Why would I want to burn my broom?)
  • You shouldn’t jump over a coffin, because the dead will rise. (I can’t help but wonder if “coffin jumping” was ever a real problem … )

Size, Travel, Home

I have struggled in writing this post. It was in my drafts folder for a while. I even struggled with what to title this post.

If I sound snobby in this writing, I apologize. (“Oh, Kosovo is so tiny, compared to my huge, superpower country!”) It is not my intention to come off that way. What I want to do is share some thoughts about Kosovo, travel, and “home.”

Another volunteer is from Texas. She recently showed me this photo, which kind of blew my mind:

Texas to Kosovo ratio

Before school ended, I talked about the United States with my fourth grade class. No one knew how many states the U.S. has. I told them 50, and I said, “Imagine 50 Kosovos.” But even that isn’t accurate. Kosovo is the size of one of our smaller states. The city where I used to live has a larger population than all of Kosovo, and Chicago isn’t even the U.S.’s biggest city.

Being in Kosovo has made me consider not only how big the United States is, but also how unreachable it can be. The average salary in Kosovo is equivalent to $9,600 per year. Kosovars also have the most restricted travel visas of anyone in Europe (the article I reference is from December 2015, but is still true today). When you consider these factors, buying a plane ticket to visit the U.S. seems near impossible.

I have talked to people here who have told me visiting the U.S. would be a dream for them. And I will admit, I sometimes struggle to relate. To me, the U.S. is just “home.” Having lived in Kosovo for a year now, it is strange to think many people I know have never been there.

Another volunteer friend of mine is from Arizona, a state I have never visited. She went home recently. She told me that while she was there, it was really important to her to visit the Grand Canyon. It is a big part of “home” for her. It is also strange to think that while she and I are both from the U.S., I have never seen the Grand Canyon, nor is it a place that signifies “home” to me.

Anyway, this is just a hodgepodge collection of some things I have been considering lately. Thanks for reading, as always.

Pristina Bazaar

A volunteer friend suggested visiting the bazaar in Pristina, so a small group of us went last week. I had no idea there was a bazaar in Pristina!

There was SO MUCH produce for sale, for prices even cheaper than what I can find in my village. (Fifty cents for a carton of strawberries, versus 1.50 Euro in my village.) You can also finds lots of other goods at the bazaar, everything from clothing and yarn, to household items, to cigarettes.

SO much produce! This was just one stall.
So delicious …
Dry goods, honey, and çifteli (2-stringed instrument)
Wall upon wall of cigarettes
We kept waiting for a box avalanche. It didn’t happen.

As far as I know, the bazaar is open every week day. You can find it here:

 

pristina kosovo bazaar map.PNG

My Favorite Photos from the Second Quarter

Without further adieu, here are my favorite photos from December 2017 until now. By my own method of counting, I have completed my second quarter of Peace Corps service.

pc-christmas
Peace Corps conference in December
po-e-ze
At the Po-E-Ze Competition

Vacation has started! #pristina #butnotforlong

A post shared by April Gardner (@hellofromkosovo) on

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Eiffel Tower

London calling! #cheesy #tourist #london #england🇬🇧

A post shared by April Gardner (@hellofromkosovo) on

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Chelsea and April, at a London Pub
charliechelsea-sierra-april
With Charlie, Chelsea, and Sierra, in Prizren, Kosovo

Serbian monastery in the snow. #peja #kosovo

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A walk in Pristina in February
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Happy kitty!

#Skopje #Macedonia #church 🇲🇰

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Fortress/castle from the Ottoman Empire, Skopje, Macedonia
ecological museum peja female dress
Traditional Kosovar clothing
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Visiting the Ecological Museum

April in Rome Favorite

April in Rome Umbrella Pines
Umbrella Pines
roman forum
Inside the Roman Forum
April Nicole
April and Nicole at Costanza Restaurant, Rome
Brandenburg gate 3
Tim, Rachel, and April, in Berlin
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Easter Eggs
art museum budapest
Budapest

I am so excited to be able to send my grandpa a postcard from his mother's home country! #budapest #hungary #motherland

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Kosovo village Catholic church
My village in Kosovo
April Mirusha Waterfall
April at Mirusha Wateralls
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April, under a waterfall
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Anniversary dinner! Shay, April, Christian, Val, and Charlie

As always, thanks for reading! You can see my favorite photos from the first quarter here.

Mirusha Waterfalls, Kosovo

April Mirusha Waterfall
April at Mirusha Wateralls

On Saturday, two volunteer friends and I visited Mirusha Waterfalls.

Mirusha map.jpg

Our trip was almost thwarted by the threat of rain. But by the end of the week, the forecast had cleared. I’m so glad we decided to go!

The hike to the waterfalls is a few kilometers. Along the way, we saw lots of beautiful wild flowers.

Canadian Thistle
Canadian Thistle

wild flowers kosovo

When we reached this stream, we knew we were getting closer …

Stream Kosovo

And here’s the first waterfall!

First Waterfall Mirusha Kosovo

After that, we hiked up to a second waterfall. The path was steep and rocky, and at several points, we had to climb, using rocks to propel ourselves upward. The journey was totally worth it! We reached a second waterfall, and pretty much had the place to ourselves. It was the perfect spot to stop and eat our picnic lunch.

Second Waterfall Mirusha Kosovo
The second waterfall …
Hiking women waterfall
Hiking women
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My companions  …
second Waterfall Mirusha Kosovo 2
Behind the waterfall, where we ate our picnic lunch
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Moi
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Oh, just chillin’ at the base of a waterfall …

Visiting Mirusha Waterfalls was one of the most relaxing, enjoyable times I have had in Kosovo.

April Mirusha Waterfall 2